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New Republic: Climate Change = Vietnam War

By David Middleton | Watts Up With That? | March 18, 2019

Climate Change Is This Generation’s Vietnam War

It’s an existential threat to millennials—and older Americans are standing in the way of action.

By MATT FORD – The New Republic – March 14, 2019

Every year, the world’s elite gather like the Illuminati in the Swiss chalet town of Davos for the World Economic Forum, where they discuss how to solve humanity’s most pressing problems. Often that results in comically out-of-touch conversations, such as the idea, put forth at this year’s summit, that digital “upskilling” can solve economic inequality. But sometimes it provides a platform for someone like the 16-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg, who appeared before these elites like the prophet Cassandra.

“Either we prevent 1.5 degrees Celsius of warming or we don’t,” she said at the summit in January. […]

Like the Vietnam protesters of the ’60s and ’70s, millennials have shown a knack for mass organizing. […]

The ruling gerontocracy won’t make it easy for younger Americans to translate their political energy into policy. […]

The Vietnam War was a clear mortal threat to young people, tens of millions of whom were eligible to be drafted; nearly 60,000 Americans were killed in the conflict. Climate change presents a different sort of threat to millennials. It’s less immediate than an ongoing war, less visceral than being shot at. But ultimately it will prove more catastrophic. Even if drastic action is taken over the next decade, the impact of rising global temperatures on civilization will dwarf the Vietnam War’s bloodshed. The World Health Organization has projected that come 2030, climate change will cause an additional 250,000 deaths per year.

Combatting climate change will take much more effort than ending the Vietnam War, and much longer. […]

I’m still laughing. When I saw the title, I said to myself, “Self, they’re right. The Global War on the Weather is like the Vietnam War. No matter how much blood & treasure our government spends, it can’t win.” But, the author went in a whole different direction; he’s comparing the Global War Against the Weather to protests against the Vietnam War.

I think my analogy is better. In the early 1960’s, the choices were: Either we defeat communism in Southeast Asia or we don’t. From 1953 to 1975 spent $168 billion (almost $1 trillion in 2011 USD) and 58,000 American lives on a war that was unwinnable under the conditions imposed by our government. In the Global War Against the Weather, we face a choice of preventing or not preventing 1.5 °C of warming.

“Either we prevent 1.5 degrees Celsius of warming or we don’t,” [Greta Thunberg] said at the summit in January.

Greta, I’m afraid I have bad news for you. With or without the New Green Deal Cultural Revolution… we don’t prevent 1.5 °C of warming. Let’s use the Paris Accord as a proxy for the Green New Deal Cultural Revolution.

Bjorn Lomborg

We already have 1.0 °C relative to the mid 1800’s and about 1.5 °C relative to the coldest phase of the Little Ice Age, the coldest part of the Holocene Epoch. If 1.5 to 2.0 °C of warming relative to the glacial interstadial temperatures of the Little Ice Age is an “existential threat to millennials,” their threshold for existence is set too low (or would that be too high?).

Central Greenland temperature reconstruction (data from Alley, 2000)

The Vietnam War was a clear mortal threat to young people, tens of millions of whom were eligible to be drafted; nearly 60,000 Americans were killed in the conflict. […]

The World Health Organization has projected that come 2030, climate change will cause an additional 250,000 deaths per year.

Is this a non sequitur or a red herring?

Vietnam War…

STATISTICS FOR INDIVIDUALS IN UNIFORM AND IN COUNTRY
VIETNAM VETERANS

3. 2,709,918 Americans served in Vietnam , this number represents 9.7% of their generation.

CASUALTIES

2. Non-hostile deaths: 10,800

3. Total: 58,202 (Includes men formerly classified as MIA and Mayaguez casualties). Men who have subsequently died of wounds account for the changing total.

The United States War Dog Association

(a) 2,709,918 divided by 9.7% equals 27,937,299.

(b) 58,202 divided by 27,937,299 equals 0.002… 0.2%.

(c) 99.8% of the Vietnam War generation did not die in the Vietnam War.

Those were real deaths. The brave men and women who sacrificed their lives in the Vietnam War were real people… They have names.

Global War Against the Weather…

The World Health Organization has projected that come 2030, climate change will cause an additional 250,000 deaths per year.

Is this comparable to to Vietnam War in any way, shape or form?

World Birth and Death Rates

Estimated 2011

Death Rate

• 8 deaths/1,000 population

• 55.3 million people die each year

• 151,600 people die each day

• 6,316 people die each hour

• 105 people die each minute

• Nearly two people die each second

In 2011, 55.3 million real people died. That’s 0.8% of 7 billion people. If I add 250,000 to 55.3 million, it’s still 0.8% of 7 billion people. Furthermore, these hypothetical deaths are the results of models. There will be no way to actually attribute any of these deaths, if they occur, to whatever climate changes actually occur between now and 2030.

Now, we do have a pretty good idea how many real people, with names, are currently dying due to energy poverty.

Energy Poverty Kills More People Than Coal and Cecil B. DeMille… Combined!

4 million is 7% of 55.3 million. Will a $240/gal tax on gasoline to fund a $122 trillion Global War on Weather make energy poverty better or worse? My bet is on worse.

Combatting climate change will take much more effort than ending the Vietnam War, and much longer.

Note to The New Republic: There’s only 1 “t” in combating.

The Global War Against the Weather will cost at least $122 trillion, claim tens of millions of lives and have no discernible affect on the weather.

March 20, 2019 - Posted by | Economics, Mainstream Media, Warmongering, Science and Pseudo-Science

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